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Mining effluent (liquid industrial waste) threatens lands, waters and wildlife across Canada and the United States. 

Environment and Climate Change Canada is currently developing coal mining effluent regulations (CMER). These regulations will manage effluent for all existing and future coal mines in Canada by creating standards for wastewater expelled from mine sites.

It is CRITICAL that these regulations serve the interests of aquatic species, ecosystems and the health of our watersheds, NOT coal companies.
Send your letter now.


 

Unfortunately, the proposed regulations have been significantly weakened due to lobbying by the coal industry and provincial governments in Canada.


The coal industry and the Governments of Alberta and BC have stated that the regulations are too hard for industry to meet. As a result, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) has increased the proposed allowable concentration of toxic substances in the effluent released into our watersheds— endangering fish, other wildlife and habitat across borders. By doing so, ECCC is putting the profits of industry ahead of concerns for the environment.
 
Environmental regulations must be created to protect the environment. They should not be shaped by what industry does or doesn't think is ‘achievable,’ especially when there is an extraordinarily high risk to lands, waters and wildlife. If a company cannot meet environmentally-safe water quality standards, they should not be allowed to operate. Period.
 
What's more, once these regulations are formalized — a process that happens when they are published in the Canada Gazette, the official newspaper of the Government of Canada — it is HIGHLY unlikely that they will change.
 

Send your letter to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, the Minister of Natural Resources and the CMER Policy Group today. Tell them we MUST create regulations that protect the environment, not coal companies.